Archive for February, 2014

Climate Change course cooks!

Grandparents concerned what future their grandchildren will inherit. A landscape photographer; a green builder; a micro-farmer and nature publisher; an ecology-minded poet; bird-lovers; activists and caregivers. We met every Thursday evening at Canio’s Books to discuss climate change. The course, designed by the Northwest Earth Institute (check out: http://www.nwei.org), provided thought-provoking readings and stimulating questions. We didn’t agree on every point, but all twelve of us feel passionately about the fate of our Earth, and our little corner of paradise on the east end of Long Island.
After working through thought-provoking articles on Global Warming and Powering a Bright Future, we met for a potluck supper at the net-zero home of one of our members. The great room was warm and toasty when we arrived, heated by the sun that very cold February evening, the house a quiet testament to the technology at hand that can help make a difference. The food was healthy and delicious. Some good cooks in this group! What’s more, we seem to have staying power, a “renewable” energy source, sustained by our being together.
We’ve begun a letter-writing campaign. Several members will join with Citizens Climate Action to lobby our representatives in Washington in June. Others are planning a regional climate summit, and a conference devoted to Long Island nature. Check out (www.longislandnature.org)  Our individual efforts seem to increase in community. We look forward to doing more, and to hosting another Northwest Earth Institute course soon. Won’t you join us?

Thomas Merton’s birthday and beyond

An enthusiastic group celebrated the 99th anniversary of Thomas Merton’s birth, January 31, with interesting discussion from all and helpful commentary from our facilitator, Eda Lorello, RCWP. Our focus on “Firewatch” was  enriched by audio remarks of Anthony Padovano.  After our meeting, we headed to  Conca D’Oro for pizza and conversation.
   This February, as we celebrate African American history, we might re-read Merton’s writings on race. His “Fourth & Walnut” experience from Conjectures of a Guilty Bystander stands out as an ecstatic moment of unity with all humanity. 
    Our next meeting on March 28 will consider the following works: Vows of Conversation, Thoughts in Solitude, New Seeds of Contemplation and Hagia Sofia. These excerpts are all found in Laurence Cunningham’s Thomas Merton: Spiritual Master. Will you be joining us?